HCIL-91-05

Remote direct manipulation: A case study of a telemedicine workstation
Keil-Slawik, R., Plaisant, C., Shneiderman, B.
April 1991
Human Aspects in Computing: Design and Use of Interactive Systems and Information Management, 4th Int. Conf. on HCI (Stuttgart, Sept. 91) 1006-1011. Also Sparks of Innovation in Human-Computer Interaction, Shneiderman, B., Ed., Ablex (June 1993) 51-61.
HCIL-91-05, CS-TR-2655, CAR-TR-551
This paper describes our experience with the design of a remote pathologist`s workstation. We illustrate how our effort to apply direct manipulation principles led us to explore remote direct manipulation designs. The use of computer and communication systems to operate devices remotely introduces new challenges for users and designers. In addition to the usual concerns, the activation delays, reduced feedback, and increased potential for breakdowns mean that designers must be especially careful and c reative. The user interface design is closely linked to the total system design.
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